Book Reviews (2018) by Joseph M. Sherlock
book review'

'Passing Parade: Obituaries & Appreciations' by Mark Steyn

This is a 326-page collection of 50 obituaries for celebrities or near-celebrities as well as Frank Sinatra's piano player and the man who invented Cool Whip. Post-mortem profiles included Bob Hope, the Queen Mum, Prince Rainier, Ray Charles, Rosemary Woods, JFK, Jr., Idi Amin and more. Each obit is interesting in itself. Many are irreverent and witty; all are chock full of information about the deceased.

Mark also wrote 'America Alone' and 'After America', both of which I favorably reviewed.

This book contains lots of fun stories including a few involving sexual peccadilloes of the famous. Here are some tidbits I enjoyed:

Andrew Cavendish, the 11th Duke of Devonshire, was known for his "prodigious philandering," he testified in a court case. "English girls are the best in the world. As for a dalliance, well, the French have their strengths and the Italians are very agreeable. But, if you want my advice, stick to English women." Spoken like a true patriot.

Centenarian Senator Strom Thurmond had wandering hands and once "made an ill-advised attempt at bipartisan outreach and groped Senator Patty Murray." This doesn't speak well of the man's taste in women or, perhaps, it simply demonstrates what a horndog the orange-haired geezer was. He once had sex in the back seat of his car with a condemned murderess during her transfer from the women's prison to death row. Strom was said to have "a soft spot for (the murderous) Mrs. Logue, whom he'd hired as a teacher back when he was School Superintendent. She didn't meet the minimum qualifications for the post but was said to have had unusual 'vaginal muscular dexterity'." She probably was hotter in the sack than Patty Murray, though. Here's a quote attributed to Senator John Tower: "When ol' Strom dies, they'll have to beat his pecker down with a baseball bat in order to get that coffin lid closed."

Mark wrote about Englishman Jess 'The Bishop' Yates, "the organ-playing host of a top-rated religious show called 'Stars on Sunday'. The Bishop's career had come to a sudden end when he was discovered also to be playing his organ with a 16 year-old girl." Oops.

Katherine Graham was proprietress of the Washington Post and was famous for her D.C. A-list-only parties. When she died in 2001, Steyn remarked that "judging from the tome of the drooling eulogies," some people were assuming that ol' Kay would be "continuing her salons in the unseen world and that, come their own demise, they want to make sure they're at the top table with Kay, the Kennedys, Pam Harriman and not down at the déclassé end near the powder room with God, Christ, St. Peter and other losers."

In his Tupac Shakur obit, Mark mentioned that he never knew that thug/record magnate Suge Knight lived next door to Wayne Newton in Las Vegas. "What did Wayne do to deserve that? It's like discovering Saddam Hussein lives next door to Angela Landsbury. What do they talk about over the fence?"

Verdict: Recommended. A fun and informative read. (posted 4/26/18, permalink)


'The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies' by Ben Fritz

As we've all seen many times before, the knockout punches of technology, globalism and culture shifts have put many industries on the ropes. Or turned them upside-down. Twenty-first-century Hollywood is no exception.

Stars have seen their power diminished. Productions are more often than not lifted from old television series and action comic books. Films are positioned to provide a platform for toy sales and to be re-edited to suit foreign markets, especially China. Animation films are popular because they can easily be dubbed into many languages. In addition, subscription services such as Amazon and Netflix are now commissioning films of their own. (The book doesn't cover this but, as I write this review, Netflix is proposing a venture with Comcast to broaden its audience and better compete with Amazon in the longer term.) Market strategies seem to change by the minute.

The author also points out that the old business model no longer works. In the 1980s and ’90s, losses from unexpectedly-low U.S. movie theater losses could be made up with a combination of foreign theater distribution and worldwide video sales. But video sales began drying up as internet streaming (Netflix) and short-term DVD rentals (Redbox) became popular.

Author Ben Fritz has skillfully chronicled the dramatic industry shake-up of the past 15 years with emphasis on both the financial and entertainment aspects of movie making. The downfall of Sony Pictures and the rise of Disney and Marvel are analyzed in detail, revealing the effects of emerging entertainment trends.

Stories are told in the breezy, fast-paced style of a knowledgeable insider. I learned much, including why the film business is such a crap shoot, why everything made is subject to remake and why action movies are a better bet financially than dramatic films. The author also provided expert guesses about where the industry is headed.

Verdict: Highly recommended for anyone interested in films and/or the movie biz. (Review copy provided by Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt) (posted 4/20/18, permalink)



'Why We Sleep: Unlocking The Power Of Sleep And Dreams' by Matthew Walker, Ph.D.

This book is a New York Times bestseller probably because people are attracted by the title and by thumbing through the first chapter or so. In fact, the first few chapters were quite interesting, then the style lurched into Research Paper Mode and became dreadfully boring. I shouldn't be surprised; Walker is a professor of neuroscience and psychology at UC Berkeley.

He is also master of the In My Field overstatement, positing that we are in the midst of a "silent sleep loss epidemic" that poses "the greatest public health challenge we face in the 21st century." Funny, I would have thought it was North Korea. Or Iran. Or global warming. Silly me.

I did learn a few tips for better sleep but I had to trudge through a lot of wordy, scientific mumbo sprinkled with jumbo to find them.

Verdict: A real snoozer. (posted 4/18/18, permalink)


'The Life Steve McQueen' by Dwight Jon Zimmerman

Done in a lotsa-pictures, coffee-table-book style (but too-small in size) and containing biographical information (but lacking the drilled-down details found in most biographies), this book is more of a celebration of Steve McQueen - the person, the movie star, the racer and, ultimately, the legend - the King of Cool.

Each chapter is a stand-alone vignette about a particular aspect of McQueen. Naturally, there's a chapter for each of his films, including his first starring role in the 1958 horror flick, 'The Blob'. The title song became a minor hit that year; it was written by another unknown, Burt Bacharach. Naturally, there's a chapter on 'Bullitt', McQueen's most iconic movie.

In addition to films, there are chapters devoted to his early days, his television years, his motorcycles, cars, racing endeavors, his Don Quixote-like quest for the ultimate racing movie: 'Le Mans', the 1971 film which bankrupted his production company and reportedly cost him his first marriage.

There are also chapters about McQueen's possessions, his love of jazz and his street cars - including his Jaguar XK-SS Roadster (Steve called it The Green Rat) which the book reveals he sold in 1969, "but missed it so much that he bought it back in 1977." I stood beside that very Jaguar at 'Allure of the Automobile' exhibit at the Portland Art Museum in 2011:

There are also chapters about his watches, favorite alcoholic beverages (Old Milwaukee beer) his love of jazz - as exemplified by Bullitt's jazz-inspired score, arranged for brass and percussion by legendary Lalo Schriffrin. In the same movie, the jazz quartet performing in the Coffee Cantata scene was Meridian West - chosen by McQueen when he heard them play at a gig in Sausalito.

This book is an easy and informative read for anyone who enjoyed Steve McQueen - the man, the racer or the actor.

Verdict: Strongly recommended. (Review copy provided by Motorbooks, an imprint of Quarto Publishing Group) (posted 4/12/18, permalink)


'China's Great Wall of Debt: Shadow Banks, Ghost Cities, Massive Loans, and the End of the Chinese Miracle' by Dinny McMahon

This book is part-way between China-Cheerleader Tom Friedman ('That Used To Be Us') and China-Is-Killing-Us John Bassett III ('Factory Man').

Author McMahon, who spent a decade in China as a journalist covering the Chinese economy and financial system for the Wall Street Journal and for Dow Jones Newswires, provides an inside look at the unsteady foundations of China's 'miracle' economy, which is built on mountains of debt combined with corrupt and unprofitable state-owned industries. Solid data are hard to come by and the numbers are often fudged. The state still controls the actions of independent companies which makes them uncompetitive or are forced to abandon markets because the state suddenly deems products as "not profitable enough."

I have previously related the story of price increases by Chinese manufacturers of diecast model cars caused by the Chinese government deciding that major industries such as mobile phones, computers, and iPads get priority for land space and other less-clean, lower-margin industries such as diecasting must relocate - sometimes to a low-labor-cost country like Bangladesh or Vietnam. Or go out of business.

The book is filled with individual stories and I learned much: Bobbies, the lavender-stuffed teddy bears which are so popular in China that they have severely tested Australia's lavender-growing capacity. Or the personal shoppers (daigou): There are forty thousand of them in Australia alone, who purchase foreign-made products (milk powder, vitamins, shampoo, painkillers, etc.) for Chinese citizens who are wary of consumables manufactured in their home country.

Verdict: Recommended. An eye-opener of a book. (Review copy provided by Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt) (posted 4/10/18, permalink)


'The Last 100 Days: FDR at War and at Peace' by David B. Woolner

Seventy-three years after his death, historians are still debating the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Regardless of how you feel about his legacy, there is no doubt that, in his 12 years as president, FDR changed America forever.

This book is about the 100 days preceding Roosevelt's death. Significant events happened during this period including the Yalta Conference and FDR's visit to Egypt for a meeting with King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, when Roosevelt unsuccessfully lobbied for support Jewish homeland in Palestine. Author David B. Woolner presents a favorable impression of FDR during this period, nor surprising , since the Woolner is a Senior Fellow and Resident Historian of the Roosevelt Institute.

Woolner discusses Roosevelt's cardiac and circulatory problems in a less harsh manner than in Stanley Weintraub's 'Final Victory'. Contemporary physicians have speculated that the president had melanoma that started with a lesion above FDR's left eye - removed in 1940 or so - but eventually spread to his brain and abdomen. This is an explanation for the serious weight loss observed in period photographs, which were not widely published at the time. He had suffered at least one major heart attack hours before a speech in California. FDR was a very sick man and had been so for some time. He died at a relatively young age 63 and looked at least 10 years older in the days before his passing.

The book 'Stalin's Secret Agents' suggested that FDR's ill health caused him to give away too much to Russia at the wartime conferences at Teheran and Yalta, speculating that his addled (and probably cancer-ridden) brain was likely unable to comprehend the extent of his actions.

Woolner's book contains a lot of minutiae, some of it revealing, some boring.

Verdict: OK, but there are better books available which cover much of the same ground. (posted 4/4/18, permalink)


'Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don't Matter' by Scott Adams

I enjoy Adams' 'Dilbert' cartoon and his blog posts abut politics, so I thought I would enjoy the book. I did somewhat. But it felt like a lot of his old blog posts stitched together in a less-than-organized way. The book contained some valid observations and good insight into Donald Trump's campaign tactics. But, about the third time I read "I am a trained hypnotist ...", I began to scream. And Scott kept using that phrase over and over to my dismay. Unfortunately, the book so is stuffed with the author's self-praise, I'm surprised he didn't dislocate his shoulder from patting himself on the back.

Like his other book, 'How To Fail At Almost Everything And Still Win Big', as 'Win Bigly' progresses, the amount of filler and nonsense increases exponentially.

Verdict: This is a short book and is a relatively fast read, so - if you don't like it - you won't spend a lot of painful evenings with it. (posted 3/29/18, permalink)


'Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World' by Eric Metaxas

In this nearly 450-page book, author Metaxas produces a thorough biography of Martin Luther, the once-Catholic priest who spearheaded the Reformation and probably saved the Catholic Church from collapsing due to the weight of its own corruption. I favorably reviewed the author's earlier work, 'Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy', and was not disappointed by 'Martin Luther'.

This book is full of details, some interesting, some tedious. The tales of indulgence-selling (the primary cause of Luther's break from the Roman church) were well-told. I especially enjoyed reading about Pope Leo X, one of four Medici popes. Leo was a money-grubbing buffoon and was not even ordained when elected pontiff. He ramped-up the sale of indulgences - get-out-of-jail cards for those whose sins would or did send them to purgatory - in order to build the magnificent St. Peter's Basilica and care for his pet elephant. Leo employed grifters, such as the Dominican priest Johannes Tetzel to drum up business for these buy-your-way-into-Heaven schemes.

The book ends with Luther's death. I would have appreciated a additional chapter summarizing the spread of the Reformation and the growth of the Lutheran religion beyond Germany.

Verdict: Recommended. (posted 3/21/18, permalink)


'Republican Like Me: How I Left the Liberal Bubble and Learned to Love the Right' by Ken Stern

I watched Tucker Carlson interview the author and was inspired to read his 350-page book. Unfortunately, Stern - a former CEO of NPR - offers a plodding, dry work. The reality is that the author was never converted. Throughout the book, he described his encounters with Republicans as if he were observing the strange rites of a primitive tribe - a mixture of awe and disdain. His subtext is to present pro & con comparisons - many factual - but he always comes down on the side of the liberals or, when presented with a strong case for a conservative viewpoint, wonders why we can't all just get along.

As I read the book, I kept waiting for the epiphany promised in the book's title. It never happened.

Verdict: Disappointing ... a con job. (posted 3/14/18, permalink)


'Kennedy Babylon: A Century of Scandal and Depravity - Volume I' by Howie Carr

The Kennedy balloon known as Camelot has been leaking air for years as multi-generational scandals have poked holes in the inflated legend. Now Howie Carr comes along and stomps the myth flat with his fun, informative, 268-page paperback book. I particularly liked the cartoon caricatures of the players on the book's cover.

Carr is a sharp-tongued, witty columnist for the Boston Herald and a well-known radio talk-show host. The book is chock full of juicy Kennedy family scandals, including many I didn't know about. Blatant corruption, blackmail, payoffs, cheating, etc. are sprinkled throughout this book like Reese's Pieces in a Dairy Queen Blizzard. Howie peels away Jackie's carefully groomed sainted image; I learned that other Kennedys referred to her as The Widder. Teddy gets some well-deserved takedowns. The family has a multi-generational belief that they are above the law and better than the rest of us. Good hair and toothy grins will get one pretty far in gullible America.

Verdict: I can hardly wait for Volume II. (posted 3/7/18, permalink)


'Hacks: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns That Put Donald Trump in the White House' by Donna Brazile

Ms. Brazile has been active in political campaigns since the 1970s. She was Al Gore's campaign manager in the 2000 election. In this 240-page book, she looks at the 2016 election via her role as DNC chairperson - a role she unexpectedly inherited after U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz was forced to resign at the start of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

The DNC was a mess when she inherited it. The party was beset by infighting, scandal, hubris and the embarrassing revelations courtesy of WikiLeaks.

Donna thought she was going to be running the party but found out that she was really just a figurehead with little money or power. President Obama drained the DNC coffers in the 2012 campaign and after. Unlike other presidents Barry O. had little interest in raising money to pay off debt. DNC chair Wasserman Schultz was more interested in perks and partying than fiscal responsibility. Some congresswoman, eh?

The cash-rich Clintons stepped in and bailed-out the DNC in 2015 in exchange for a legal agreement giving Hillary control of money disbursement and senior appointments within DNC. This agreement helped screw Bernie Sanders during the primaries. As Mr. Dooley opined some 123 years ago, "Politics ain't beanbag."

A frustrated Brazile tried to fight back but was undercut when a WikiLeaks document showed that, as a CNN insider, Donna leaked a debate question to Hillary before a primary debate. Donna became a non-person in the Clinton's eyes and never even got a post-election Thank You from Hillary. Ms. Brazile got her revenge with this book, trashing Hillary's operatives with great fervor as well as Donald Trump, whom she despises.

This short book drags in spots, especially in the prolonged tales of hacking, especially by Russia. Brazile seems to believe that the Russians threw the election to the "despicable" Trump, glossing over Hillary's health issues, strategic campaigning mistakes, her infamous 'deplorables' speech and Hillary's general unlikeability. Her claims that Hillary won all the debates with candidate Trump are contradicted by contemporaneous polls. Brazile's charges that Trump inspired his supporters to violence are nonsense; she conveniently forgets the overwhelming violence incited by paid Democrat agitators in many places - Chicago, San Diego and Phoenix come to mind. The Democratic Party has always been the violent party - going back to the election of 1968.

Brazile has nothing but contempt for WikiLeaks yet neither she nor any other embarrassed Democrat has disproven the accuracy of Julian Assange's leaked info. Assange has denied that he got DNC information from the Russians, implying that it may have come from Brazile's friend, DNC staffer Seth Rich, whose 2016 murder remains unsolved. While Donna was spending much time and money trying to insulate the DNC servers from hacks, Hillary was busy Bleachbitting her own personal server while blithely sending classified info to Huma Mahmood Abedin who would transfer documents to her perverted husband Anthony Weiner's laptop - when he wasn't using it to troll adolescent girls, that is - so that she could print out hard copies.

I laughed out loud when I reached page 205 and read "I knew Hillary was an honest person ..." As the late Mr. Rogers might say, "Can you say 'delusional'?"

Verdict: An angry book by another bitter woman who was tossed overboard by the Clintons when she was no longer useful to their interests. Even though she claims to be a political expert, Donna Brazile still hasn't figured out why Donald Trump won and Queen Hillary lost. (posted 3/1/18, permalink)



'All Out War: The Plot to Destroy Trump' by Edward Klein

I don't want to be a Deep State conspiracy guy, but sometimes there is a compelling narrative with the ring of truth. It is believable that the Deep State screwed up the Bay of Pigs and, when Kennedy threatened to eviscerate the CIA, he was assassinated and replaced with war-monger, get-along-guy Lyndon Johnson. When Bobby Kennedy threatened to make Big Changes, he was done away-with. When MLK became too powerful, he was disposed of. When George Wallace threatened the establishment, he was taken out. And so on.

Now there's Donald Trump who threatens to "drain the swamp," and is suddenly the target of the media, Never-Trump cuckservatives, lefty Democrats and George Soros-backed radical groups. As well as those Deep State alphabet government agencies and quasi-government organizations (CIA, NSA, DOJ, FBI, OIC, NRO, State Dept., etc.) whose middle management is solidly entrenched and unaffected by political shifts in the Executive branch.

The jacket blurb for this book states: "With ferocity not seen since the Civil War, the Washington establishment and the radical Left are joining forces in an attempted coup d'état to overturn the will of the people and return power to the political and media elites who have never been more unhinged." Indeed.

Written by former New York Times Magazine editor-in-chief Edward Klein and published in October 2017, this fast-paced, easy-to-read 243-page book (excluding appendices and index) will wake you up and engage you. Despite President Trump's impressive accomplishments so far, Klein's book documents in detail the efforts of the left and Hillary supporters who will stop at absolutely nothing to try to derail Trump's presidency.

I have favorably reviewed Ed Klein's previous works, 'The Amateur: Barack Obama in the White House' as well as 'Blood Feud: The Clintons Vs. The Obamas'. Mr. Klein has once again written an insightful, interesting, timely and well-researched political book in 'All Out War'.

Recently, at American Thinker, Clarice Feldman wrote, "I stopped in for a late-night coffee with my friend, a fiction novelist who was depressed. 'I spent a year writing about a coup attempt against an outsider who by strategic brilliance defeated the handpicked candidate of a cabal of establishment powerhouses. It involved the highest officials of the FBI and Department of Justice. They manipulated a FISA Court into letting them electronically surveil the candidate and all who worked with him, unmasked their names, leaked what they found, and they still couldn't beat him. Then they engineered the recusal of the attorney general, got his deputy to appoint their bestest pal to be special counsel.

Given free rein, he (the special counsel) hired fierce partisans of the defeated candidate, used the ill-gotten information against her opponents to prosecute three people with minimal connection to the campaign - one for a dubious process crime dependent on the notes of an FBI agent who had earlier orchestrated lies about Benghazi, covered up for the misuse of classified information by the losing candidate, and oversaw the investigation into the president.'

'Sounds great,' I said, so why are you depressed?

'Every publisher I sent it to rejected it as being too implausible to sell to readers.'"

Verdict: I highly recommend Mr. Klein's book. Be afraid, be very afraid. (posted 2/21/18, permalink)


'God: A Human History' by Reza Aslan

In 171 pages (with many more pages of footnotes at the end), Aslan explores the history of worship, demonstrating that humans seem to be hardwired to believe in a supreme being (or many of them) and that even early humans ceremoniously buried their dead with the expectation of an afterlife.

The author was raised as a Muslim converted to Catholicism and later became a Sufi, so he has an interestingly broad viewpoint. Born in Iran, he currently lives in California. Aslan presents religious history for the lay reader in an engaging manner. Even the earliest religions assigned human characteristics to gods: "Whether we are aware of it or not, and regardless of whether we're believers or not, what the vast majority of us think about when we think about God is a divine version of ourselves."

Reza Aslan notes that early religions had multiple gods - one for crops, another for fertility, still another for war, etc. Israel went from many gods to one and started a trend which endures.

This book will neither make you a believer nor change your brand of religion. But it will make you think - a good thing.

Verdict: Recommended. (posted 2/15/18, permalink)


'The Smear: How Shady Political Operatives and Fake News Control What You See, What You Think, and How You Vote' by Sharyl Attkisson

If you're interested in the inside skinny on political dirty tricks, this is the book for you. Smear tactics have been in use for ages but, in today's world, the process has been organized, optimized, streamlined and supercharged. It helps that many of today's journalists are lazy, careless and have a liberal bias. The result: easily-implanted Fake News delivered to content-hungry journalists by professional sleazeballs hiding behind political PACs and LLCs.

In this 285-page book, Attkisson exposes the opposition researchers, spin doctors and pundits who attempt to shape the viewpoints of potential voters.

Speaking of pundits, the book included a quote Karl Rove made in early 2016 about the presidential election: "If Mr. Trump is its standard-bearer, the GOP will lose the White House and the Senate, and its majority in the House will fall dramatically." So ... how'd that work out, Karl? Why is Rove still on television?

Recently, Michael Walsh wrote, "Ever since postwar American journalism sacrificed its soul on the altar of celebrity sometime in the mid-'80s, a terrible day of reckoning for the craft has been in the works. The "gets" and the gotchas, the "how do you respond to" questions, the how-do-you-feels; the unseemly scrums, the willingness to endure any humiliation from their betters in the hopes of basking, however fleetingly, in reflected glory - that day finally arrived," stripping bare "the profession's pretenses to objectivity and truth-seeking, and exposed them for the tawdry, politicized whores they really are." Indeed.

Much of the book focuses on the devious attempts to derail the Trump campaign by both Republican and Democratic operatives. Ms. Attkisson documents, in great detail, many of the behind-the-scenes conniving and dirty tricks. While a slow read at times, much of the book was a real eye-opener, although I thought Sharyl's 2015 book, 'Stonewalled', was more interesting.

Verdict: Recommended. (posted 2/7/18, permalink)



'Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans: The Battle That Shaped America's Destiny' by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger

Most people think that the War of 1812 concerned battles in DC and around the Chesapeake Bay. Not so. In fact, the Battle of New Orleans was a vital part of the campaign to drive the British military out of America. This 232-page book sets the record straight and relates the efforts of Major General Andrew Jackson to protect New Orleans, a major U.S. port, at the mouth of the commercially-vital Mississippi River.

The authors also wrote, 'George Washington's Secret Six: The Spy Ring That Saved the American Revolution', which I reviewed favorably in 2014.

As expected, they present the compelling story, interesting personalities and various locations in a readable manner making for an enjoyable history lesson.

Verdict: As a casual student of history, I found this book fascinating and interesting. Recommended. (posted 2/1/18, permalink)


'Billionaire At The Barricades: The Populist Revolution from Reagan to Trump' by Laura Ingraham

In a world full of RINO consultants and Never Trumpers, Laura Ingraham was an early supporter of Donald Trump. A self-described political junkie, she began working as a speechwriter during the Reagan administration. In her latest book, she recounts the beginnings of the conservative movement with Barry Goldwater's unsuccessful 1964 presidential run. Recounting the foibles and accomplishments of various presidencies since then, Ingraham posits that Ronald Reagan was the first conservative/populist president. And that Donald Trump may be the second.

In this insightful, fast-paced 275-page book, Laura soon gets to the political rise of Donald Trump. As a well-connected pundit and political insider, Laura Ingraham shares a lot of behind-the-scenes information I hadn't heard before. She also analyzes political history, showing how the populist movement grew - not just from the frustration with the liberal overreaching policies of the Obama administration, but also the despair over big-government, globalist policies of the Bushes and the dismal candidacies of McCain and Mitt Romney.

Nascent populism fueled the campaigns of Pat Buchanan and Ross Perot, when conservatives were dismayed by the global ambitions of George H.W. Bush. Populism rose again with the birth of the Tea Party, which helped create a Republican House and later, a Republican senate.

The ever-growing populist movement held-its-nose at the Republican establishment's offering of 2016 presidential candidates, rejecting those who spouted the same old tired Party line (Bush, Kasich, Rubio, Pataki, Gilmore, Graham) and those purists who don't play well with others (Ted Cruz, Rand Paul), in favor of a shake-em-up populist/pragmatist and sometimes-conservative Donald Trump.

Trump appeared in all full-on brashness - the first candidate to announce by descending from above on a gold escalator. He is a rare breed - a candidate with enough fuck-you money that he doesn't have to be nice to lobbyists - a big selling point with unhappy voters, who feel that their representatives are being co-opted by influence peddling.

On a personal note, I enjoyed watching the usual gang Beltway television pundits go into various states of apoplexy when the subject of the Trump candidacy was brought up. These Washington Insiders never understood the Trump phenomenon. At 2015 Iowa State Fair, The Donald even gave kiddie rides on his Trump-branded helicopter, while - across the field - frightening Men-in-Black kept children away from the Hillary Bus, which had the joyless air of a prison transporter about it. How appropriate.

Laura reports on Trump's unconventional but successful campaign, warts and all. And post-election, his struggle to fulfill his promises to the people, despite resistance from his own party in Congress and having to battle a spiteful, biased press (who are still in mourning because the expected coronation of Queen Hillary never materialized and consider President Trump the Devil Incarnate).

The easy-to-read book is full of facts, humorous tidbits and has the ring of authenticity. I enjoyed every page.

Verdict: Highly recommended. (posted 1/24/18, permalink)


'Leonardo Da Vinci' by Walter Isaacson

The author demonstrates his usual impressive thoroughness in this 600+ page biography. Isaacson also wrote 'The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution' and 'Steve Jobs' - both of which I reviewed favorably.

The da Vinci book has two problems. First, since the subject died almost 500 years ago, it is difficult to obtain reliable biographical details about Leonardo Da Vinci. Second, the author mixes biographical information with lessons in art history and appreciation. While it was informative, there was waaay too much art analysis for my liking.

My takeaway from reading the book was that, while Leonardo was brilliant, he was easily distracted by his many simultaneous projects and failed to deliver works to his patrons on time - sometimes not at all. Mona Lisa apparently began as a commission for a patron but da Vinci kept screwing around with it and took almost 40 years to complete the painting. His lifetime of procrastination left a legacy of unfinished works and ideas which never got beyond the sketch or model stage.

It should be noted that this book is printed on thick, high-quality paper with numerous photographs of relevant artwork and sketches.

Verdict: This massive book will probably impress Renaissance historians but casual readers will likely skip through some parts which they find tedious. (posted 1/18/18, permalink)



'Printer's Error: Irreverent Stories from Book History' by J.P. Romney and Rebecca Romney

This 280-page book contains some interesting stories. The one on Ben Franklin was especially enjoyable. In this tome about the history of printed books, each chapter stands on its own. Some chapters are very educational; others are boring.

I picked this book up because it was on display at my local library and the cover attracted me. I knew nothing about the authors. I found out later that Rebecca Romney is a regular on 'Pawn Stars' - a program I have never watched - and has a following as a knowledgeable hottie. Which meant nothing to me.

The problem with 'Printer's Error' is that each chapter is littered with sarcasm, snide remarks, snark, filppancy, stupid pop culture references and pointless profanity. The authors' lame attempts at humor fell flat, making it difficult to take them as serious as historians.

Verdict: Too bad. It could have been a contender. (posted 1/10/18, permalink)


'The Great Quake: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet' by Henry Fountain

On Good Friday, March 27, 1964, a massive 9.2 magnitude earthquake struck Alaska. It was the biggest earthquake in North American recorded history and the shaking and the huge tsunamis that followed killed more than 130 people. It demolished the city of Valdez and swept away the island village of Chenega. Portions of the Alaska Railroad were destroyed, buildings and people were devoured by large fissures, large commercial buildings in Anchorage crumbled. People in Crescent City, California and near Newport, Oregon were killed by surprise waves. Well-water tables surged as far away as Florida.

This book is about the quake, its devastating effects and about the people who were affected by it. Human interest stories are sprinkled throughout and, at under 250 pages, the book makes for an easy read.

Verdict: Recommended ... very informative. (posted 1/4/18, permalink)


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Spelling, punctuation and syntax errors are cheerfully repaired when I find them; grudgingly fixed when you do.

If I have slandered any brands of automobiles, either expressly or inadvertently, they're most likely crap cars and deserve it. Automobile manufacturers should be aware that they always have the option of trying to change my mind by providing me with vehicles to test drive.

If I have slandered any people or corporations in this blog, either expressly or inadvertently, they should buy me strong drinks (and an expensive meal) and try to prove to me that they're not the jerks I've portrayed them to be. If you're buying, I'm willing to listen.

Don't be shy - try a bribe. It might help.


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